INTRODUCTION, MEAD PRODUCTS

RACKING THE TRADITIONAL MEAD

After waiting for approximately three months (honestly, I forgot how long it has been so I just threw in the three xD) The day I’ve been waiting for has come! The time to rack the mead and adjust the taste if necessary 🙂

Racking is the process of cleaning, and filtering, the Must off of the residue that accumulates at the bottom of the carboys. This residue consists of mainly dead yeast, and other ingredients used to craft the Must.

Racking is necessary for two reasons:

  1. To improve the fermentation process.
  2. To prevent off-tastes from spoiling the mead.

The process didn’t take long, all that was needed was just the siphoning hose to siphon the Must from one carboy into another, and, a makeshift filter that I crafted out of a pipe and a sieve net to block the residue and later discard it.

 

 

The residue is quite delicate, the slightest movement can easily disturb and agitate it, making it easy for it to be sucked through the hose.  Observation and attention, were needed all the time to make sure not to disturb the residue in order not to siphon it, because, this will render the racking process useless.

32446764_2054703877890672_8129699125059911680_n
LEFT: CARBOY BEFORE RACKING – RIGHT: CARBOY AFTER RACKING

Once racking was done, the must was tasted to determine how it is shaping up, and to see if any improvements were necessary to adjust it. I determined that from the taste there was a strong presence of orange in it, so, I diluted some honey in water and added it to increase the presence of honey in the Must.

32372874_2054704044557322_3738481972733804544_n
THE MUST AFTER RACKING AND ADDING HONEY

The Must will ferment again due to the added fresh honey, and probably after a month or two, it will be racked again, and tasted to determine if extra honey will needed, basically the Must is in its “trail and error” stage.

More information and posts will follow soon 🙂

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s